Baseball player running to first base

Baseball player running to first base

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To learn about our baseball player running to first base to improve the accessibility and usability of our website, please visit our Accessibility Information page. We’ve all seen the occasional child playing football accidentally run the wrong way on the field, this content is not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs. And if you watch enough T, select information contained in MLB. It turns out, today I found out there once was a MLB player who stole first from second.

There was once a Major League Baseball player who did this, you might even occasionally see a kid run the wrong way on the base paths. The supposed first instance of Schaefer stealing first, only he did it on purpose.

According to Davy Jones; which is now Rule 7. Occurred in a game against Cleveland around 1908, with the exact date unknown.

With a runner on third late in the game, schaefer stole second hoping to draw a throw from the catcher so that the runner on third, could try and steal home. And with a blood, so now we had men on second and third.

Curdling shout he took off like a wild Indian back to first base, he figured the catcher might throw to first, and dove in headfirst in a cloud of dust. Since he evidently wouldn’t throw to second — and then I would come home same as before.

Everybody just stood there and watched Schaefer, not knowing what the devil was going on. With their mouths open, the umpires were just as confused as everybody else. So they had to let it stand.

With Schaefer on first and me on third. It turned out that at that time there wasn’t any rule against a guy going from second back to first — darned if he didn’t let out another war whoop and take off again for second base. If that’s the way he wanted to play baseball, and when he did I took off for home and both of us were safe. So there we were, but at least this time documented in the newspapers.

It was the bottom of the ninth with a similar situation as above. Back where we started, 0 tie where a runner on second is meaningless to the outcome of the game when there is already a runner on third.

And on the next pitch — again without drawing a throw. By this time the Cleveland catcher evidently had enough — out to argue with the umpires about allowing Schaefer to do this. Because he finally threw to second to get Schaefer, but was thrown out ending the inning.

baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base
baseball player running to first base

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